Archive for the ‘Beef’ Category

April 28th is National Prime Rib Day

April 28, 2011

Prime rib is a delicious meal that can be enjoyed at any occasion! Just thinking about prime rib gets your mouth watering. And of course, the only way to correctly celebrate National Prime Rib Day is to enjoy a big, juicy cut of it cooked your favorite way!

It all starts with the grade of the meat. Real prime rib is graded USDA Prime, and can be quite difficult to obtain. Other grades of meat in the United States are Choice, Select, Cutter, and Canner. The best type of meat to use for prime rib is Prime, but Choice meat will work as well

Once you have the meat, then you just have to trim the fat, add whatever types of seasoning or sauces you like, and cook it! The heat should be applied slowly, steadily, and evenly until the internal temperature of the meat reaches a specific degree.

After it’s cooked, just carve and enjoy! Happy National Prime Rib Day!

Click here for my Prime Rib Cooking Chart

Click here to learn what size roast to purchase

Click here for the perfect prime rib roast recipe:  How to roast prime rib

Prime Rib Cooking Chart:

April 28, 2011

Click on photo for more information

The chart below is only a guide. You must rely on an accurate Meat Thermometer and start taking temperatures about 45 minutes before the end of the estimated roast time.

Reminder: Instant read thermometers are not meant to be left in the roast during the cooking process.

What Size of Prime Rib/Standing Rib Roast to Buy?

April 28, 2011

A full prime rib/standing rib roast is seven (7) ribs, close to 15 pounds, and enough to feed a crowd of 14 or more people (depending on how big of eaters they are). The term “standing” means the bones are included in the roast, thus the roast can stand by itself. A rib roast comprises of seven ribs starting from the shoulder (chuck) down the back to the loin.

Click on photo for chart


Cabernet Filet Mignon Steaks

August 13, 2010

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All-American Hamburgers

June 30, 2010

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Shepherd’s Pie

June 29, 2010

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Stuffed Savoy Cabbage Rolls

June 25, 2010

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December 7, 2009

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How to make a stock

November 15, 2009

Q. What are some basic stock recipes?

A. Thank you Iris for my first question on my blog. Stock is a lot easier to make than you might think. Here are some easy recipes for chicken, beef, and vegetable stock:

  • Chicken Stock: Place 4 pounds chicken backs, wings, and bones in a large stock pot. Add 4 quarts cold water, 2 large sliced onions, 2 sliced carrots, 2 sliced ribs celery with leaves, 1 bay leaf, 4 peppercorns, 2 sprigs parsley, and 1 teaspoon dried thyme. Slowly bring to a boil and lower heat to a simmer, skimming off surface foam for first 30 minutes. Simmer a total of 2 hours; strain. Makes about 7 cups.
  • Beef Stock: Preheat oven to 450°F. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large roasting pan. Add 4 pounds beef bones and brown in oven, about 10 minutes, stirring pieces frequently. Add 2 large sliced onions, 2 sliced carrots, 2 sliced ribs celery with leaves and roast until browned. Transfer bones and vegetables to a large stock pot. Pour off fat from roasting pan and deglaze with 1 cup hot water, scraping up browned bits from bottom of pan; pour into stockpot. Add 1 bay leaf, 4 peppercorns, 2 sprigs parsley and 1 teaspoon dried thyme to stock-pot and cover with 4 quarts cold water. Slowly bring to a boil and lower heat to a simmer. Simmer 4 to 5 hours, skimming off surface foam during first 30 minutes of cooking; strain. Makes about 3 quarts.
Seasonal soup

  • Vegetable Stock: Combine 3 each finely chopped carrots, celery, leeks, and onions, along with 1/2 pound mushroom pieces, 1 bay leaf, 2 sprigs parsley, and 1 teaspoon dried thyme in a large stockpot. Cover with 3 quarts water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer and cook, covered, 2 hours; strain. Makes about 2 quarts.